Iran Feature: Saeed Malekpour, A Web Designer Condemned to Die

Saeed Malekpour and His Wife, Fatemeh EftekhariIn his photographs, Saeed Malekpour looks like an average guy, not dangerous or menacing at all. It’s a far different image from that put out by the Iranian regime, in which Malekpour is a nefarious character hell-bent on corrupting the morals of ordinary citizens, insulting the State-sanctioned religion, and agitating against the Government and the Supreme Leader.

And it for that latter image that Malekpour may die.

An Iranian by birth, Saeed and his wife moved to Canada in 2004 so he could pursue his education. In 2005, he was granted permanent residency by the Ottawa Government. In 2008,  when he returned to Iran to see his dying father, he was thrown into Evin Prison.

The authorities said software that Malekpour developed was being used by the general public to upload pornography to the internet. Malekpour’s supporters say he had no knowledge of that use, let alone intent to spread obscene material, but in 2009, he appeared on State TV to “confess” to all the allegations.  He was put on death row in 2010.

The verdict was annulled by the Supreme Court in 2011 and sent back to the lower court, only for the judges to re-assert the validity of the charges and sentence. Last month, the Supreme Court rejected Malekpour’s last appeal.

Maryam Nayeb-Yazdi, the coordinator of the website dedicated to Malekpour’s release, wrote yesterday:

One of the lawyers said: “If we [Saeed's lawyers] had a chance to review the case file, then we would have been able to prevent the execution of the sentence. By conducting a review we could have pointed out that an expert has never been brought into the case for investigation. The case file was sent straight to the Circuit Court for Execution of Sentences without review.” He continued: “Since Saeed Malekpour’s sentence is in the possession of the Circuit Court for Execution of Sentences, this means that they are capable of executing Saeed at any moment they wish.”

Reporters Without Borders also criticised the death sentence and its confirmation by the Supreme Court.

The Canadian House of Commons unanimously passed a motion against the sentence yesterday:

That this House express its deep concern for the safety of Iranian citizen Saeed Malekpour following reports of his imminent execution; that Canada hold Iran accountable for Mr. Malekpour’s treatment; and that this House call on Iran to reverse its current course, meet its international human rights obligations and release prisoners such as Saeed Malekpour and others who have failed to receive fair and transparent legal treatment.

Saeed’s sister, Maryam Malekpour has written an urgent appeal to the United Nations to secure the release of her brother:

We cannot believe Saeed was arrested in the first place let alone sentenced to death. We cannot believe that we have been forced to live a horrific nightmare every day for more than three years. Saeed can be illegally executed at any moment unless the international community defends his life. Saeed’s lawyers have told our family that the only hope left is the international community. All legal channels within Iran have been exhausted.

We are desperate for your help!

Saeed Malekpour’s death sentence is now with the “enforcement section”. That is the last stage before the web designer will be killed.

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Veröffentlicht am 18. Februar 2012 in Aktionen, Empfehlungen, Gesetze, Medien, Meinungen, Politik und mit , , , , , , , , , getaggt. Setze ein Lesezeichen auf den Permalink. Kommentare deaktiviert.

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