Archiv der Kategorie: Interview

Traditional elements shine in Iran’s modern art

Artist Gizella Varga-Sinai sits next to her painting, „Mazenderan(North 5)“ June 28, 2009. (photo by Gizella Varga-Sinai)

Gizella Varga-Sinai’s artwork doesn’t simply boast beauty, it recites poetry in volumes. Her “Kallehpaz” — one of the hundreds of paintings reflecting her love of Iran, Persian culture and everyday life — has found a permanent home at the George Pompidou Cultural Center in Paris.

Varga-Sinai has lived in Iran since 1967. Originally Hungarian, her passion for Persian culture probably exceeds most cultured Iranian artists. She speaks Farsi fluently with an elegant and poetic choice of words, yet with a perfect grasp of modern everyday literature.

The artist’s newest project is an amazing series of work exhibited in several countries and soon to be unveiled in Tehran. While working on this project, she is also passionately pursuing two other cultural projects. One is a short film for an upcoming festival in Tehran, a project she agreed to do to encourage Iranian youths to pursue the arts. She will also spend some time in the south of Iran to work on an art project about the Persian Gulf.

When asked in a telephone interview with Al-Monitor about young and rising Iranian artists, Varga-Sinai says, “We professional veterans need to work hard to keep up. There are so many promising young artists in today’s Iran. Some of them have this new hobby of meeting up and gathering in art galleries. A large number of upscale modern art galleries have sprung upon the artistic scene of Tehran over the recent year. Most exhibitions open on Fridays, when people are off work and traffic is surmountable. A lot of young artists and art lovers have set this tradition of meeting up at these art galleries. Girls doll up and boys dress impeccably, and they spend their Friday afternoons seeing art and mingling. It’s amazing.”

I ask Varga-Sinai about the current condition of the arts in Iran, and whether she has observed any notable developments under the presidency of Hassan Rouhani. She replies, “During [Mahmoud] Ahmadinejad’s presidency, pretty much everything in the artistic sphere was on hold. There was no activity. Over the past year, however, fresh blood is running into the veins of modern arts and artistic events in Iran. A lot has already evolved, and much is changing for the better.”

Varga-Sinai recently unveiled her travel book on Georgia, about her first trip to the country. She tells me she found it a great experience. She says, “Although the country is so close to Iran and I travel so much, I had never been there before. I love the post-socialist freedom that has brought about so many artistic virtues in Georgia, particularly among the youth. I related to that entire ambience.”

Gizella Varga-Sinai was born in Budapest at the height of World War II. The story of her life, family and upbringing is a one-of-a-kind tale spiced with everlasting longing to discover the East and yearning to decode the West. She moved to Vienna and then to Iran with her renowned filmmaker husband, Khosrow Sinai, and eventually called Tehran her home and herself Gizella Varga-Sinai.

Varga-Sinai is an artist I know well, and I have lived through the decade of not seeing her by following her artwork. She is a true artist who lives art, practices painting and preaches poetry distant from the conventional narcissism and negativity of many artists. She’s modest and cheerful and ever ready to explore and experience. So when she gathers this all into a collection reflecting her worldwide travels throughout the years, accentuating elements that have affected her work, the collection becomes a must-see.

“The last bit I’ve added to the bits and pieces symbolizing my life over the years is a copy of my national card [a relatively recent addition to Iranians’ personal identification documents]. The strong point of this exhibition is that it could be folded up and then spread out fairly easily. So it’s quite portable, although showing it with all the installation along with it requires ample space.”

In this new collection of Varga-Sinai’s art, you see her wearing slip-on shoes and carrying her brown suitcase with a maple leaf on it. She is placing her belongings and her faith in the suitcase en route to Vienna from Budapest, on the „Viennese Waltz,“ the name of the train running over the Danube between Budapest and Vienna. At an exhibition in Budapest, her daughter played her as a young aspiring dreamer. She herself was, of course, the eternal dreamer, present in the exhibition as the Varga-Sinai of today. She says she would love to show her recent work in the United States and is open to invitations to exhibit the collection.

Varga-Sinai calls herself a „Hungarian wanderer in Iran,“ which is the title of her newest batch of artwork as well. She knows Iran very well, and always speaks of the Iranian cultural, literary and natural elements that have helped shape her work over the years. She used to visit Hungary more often, when her mother was alive. In recent years and in the wake of her mother’s passing, however, she has been visiting her homeland less frequently, and has been staying more in Iran — her other and beloved homeland, as she calls it.

One of Varga-Sinai’s new creations is what she refers to as her „magical veil.“ On it, she has printed pictures of herself over the years and in the countries where she has lived, and elaborated on them with symbols of those countries and those eras. Her passport photo (in a socialist Hungarian passport, symbolizing her country as she left it), her picture combined with the lion-and-sun symbol of the Iranian flag before the revolution, and a copy of her Iranian national card are among the images. I ask her the reason she chose a white veil to collect all these symbols and elements. Varga-Sinai replied, “It bears a feeling of home, of Iran and my love of Iran. Traditional Iranian women still wear a white veil with a colored floral print when they want to go outside the house in the yard, or to run a quick errand nearby. This is the familiar veil, the chador. And mine bears its imprinted magic of the years and times.”

Gizella Varga-Sinai is an artistic phenomenon. Once, years ago, she told me, “Hungarians used to be nomads, and I think that may be the root of my passion for the East, and for Iran. Who knows? Perhaps, in another life, I was born and bred in Iran.”

Source: AL-Monitor

Advertisements

Crystal meth, skinny jeans and underground bloggers — it’s the Iran you never see

Credit: Morteza Nikoubazl/Reuters

Women gaze at jewelery displayed at an international fair in Tehran.

Life in Iran’s capital Tehran might seem stodgy — think angry ayatollahs, black chadors and mobs exhorting „Death to America.“ That’s real, but so is the less visible side of Tehran: the illicit drugs, hipster fashion and outraged bloggers.

That side of the city is on display in City of Lies: Love, Sex, Death and the Search For Truth in Tehran, the latest book from Iranian author Ramita Navai.

Navai introduces us to a handful of unlikely Tehran residents. They’re composite characters, because sharing personal details with a reporter is still a very risky business in Tehran. „The regime does not want outsiders to see Iran in all its glory and all its color,“ Navai says.

But they’re all based in fact, she insists. The book starts with the story of a man whom Navai calls Dariush, a man in his 20s who leaves a comfortable life in the US to join the underground opposition in Iran — for love.

He bungles his attempt to assassinate a local police chief, resulting in what Navai describes as „a comedy of errors.“ We meet others, including Leyla, a beautiful working-class woman who falls into prostitution and meets her end in a hangman’s noose.

Navai says that flawed individuals leading these sorts of lives — neither good nor evil — are rarely seen in reporting about Iran. „It has social problems and the regime wants to hide some of the social problems,“ she says.

But, true to Navai’s theme, even the regime has nuance. „The regime can also be quite liberal about some of its social problems,“ she says. „So, for example, the regime has got quite liberal attitudes toward drug rehabilitation. There are crystal meth drug rehab centers, there are needle exchange centers, methadone centers. Condoms are given out to prostitutes.“

The complexities and contradictions of life in Iran forces many Tehran residents to lead double lives. They show public faces to please authorities and live private lives that are far different.

Navai argues that people who live in Tehran need to live a lie to survive. She describes meeting civil servants, for example, who pretended to pray in the office, despite their limited knowledge of the Koran.

But she also sees changes, in part due to Tehran’s growing youth culture. „They are striving to live a life that’s more true to themselves,“ she says. „I think you can see this in a real sexual awakening that’s happening in Tehran that spans all social classes. Young people are kind of behaving in a freer way as regards to sex and as regards to relating to each other. And I think this will have a trickle-down effect.“

She admits that she lives the lie, as well: „You lie about going to parties, you lie about alcohol being consumed at parties, you have to lie about certain people you may hang out with.“ But she’s hopeful the changing culture will change her need to lie: „I think this will mean — hopefully, maybe I’m being optimistic — but fewer lies.“

In a certain way, though, Navai sees the lies as „a very positive thing because [Iranians] are so obsessed with being true to themselves — you know, it’s really part of our culture, it’s in all our poetry, it’s in our literature — they are intent on living the lives that they want to live, even if that means they have to lie to do so.“

Source: PRI World

Ayatollah Khamenei, Assad spoke of reforms

An Iranian police helicopter passes above portraits of Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (R) and late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini on the outskirts of Tehran, June 4, 2014. (photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Ayatollah Khamenei, Assad spoke of reforms

Hossein Sheikholeslam, Iran’s former ambassador to Syria and the current foreign policy adviser to the speaker of parliament, spoke toRamze Obour magazine about Iran’s relationship with Syria and the mistakes of the Syrian government, revealing some previously unknown information.

 

Though Sheikholeslam’s comments were recently picked up by Shargh Newspaper, the original interview took place in April before the Syrian elections. Some of his points in the interview are noteworthy in that they concede mistakes by the Syrian government. The interviewer was unafraid to challenge the official on a topic rarely covered from a nuanced angle in Iran, and the discussion also addressed a letter from Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to President Bashar al-Assad.

Sheikholeslam said that the best way out of Syria’s civil war, which has left over 170,000 dead and much of country destroyed, is through elections, as experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan show that people would not support extremists in elections. When asked, “Isn’t it too late for that now in Syria?” he said, “Yes, everything is too late. We should have done it earlier.”

He said, “From day one, the supreme leader took a position that Syria needs to undergo reforms.” He said that Qasem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps‘ Quds Force, took a message to Assad written by Ayatollah Khamenei in the first days of the protests. The message said, “The killings should not take place and reforms have to be accepted.”

Sheikholeslam said, “Assad accepted [that] reforms [were needed], but he didn’t have the proper mechanisms. Assad didn’t even have police. Whatever they had, it was the army. If it had a problem with anyone, they would shoot at the crowd with automatic weapons.”

He said many of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard commanders have been in the region and “know what Bashar’s problem is. As soon as four people would gather, instead of using police, the army would use automatic weapons. … They wanted to solve it with force.”

He added that Iran had helped in this matter and also helped form groups to negotiate with the opposition. It has been well documented by now that Iran has sent fighters into Syria to support and advise Syrian troops.

When asked, „From this democracy that you suggest and that Soleimani recommended for Syria, would Bashar Assad’s name come out of the ballot box again?” Sheikholeslam said that Iran hadn’t interfered in the domestic affairs of Syria, an assertion the interviewer rejected. Sheikholeslam blamed Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Israel for trying to make Syria’s government collapse.

The interview began by discussing modern history, most of it well known, including former President Hafez Assad’s support for Iran during the Iran-Iraq war, assistance Sheikholeslam believes prevented it from being an “Arab-Iranian” war. Syria was the only country to support Iran, while most Arab countries supported Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.

Sheikholeslam also said that with Assad’s support, Iran could not have helped form Hezbollah in Lebanon. When asked whether Iran’s support for the Syrian government is because of Syria’s support for Hezbollah, Sheikholeslam said, “No, the entire Islamic resistance, not just Hezbollah.”

This prompted a question about Hamas, which sided with Syrian rebels against Assad’s regime. “They sacrificed their relationship with Iran and Syria for a domestic Muslim Brotherhood issue,” Sheikholeslam said, calling Hamas‘ move a “vital mistake.” However, he said that Iran and Hamas “strategically have no choice but unity.” When asked if Hamas‘ relationship with Qatar could change this relationship, Sheikholeslam said, “Qatar will not give Hamas even one bullet.”
Source: AI-Monitor.com

Galerie-Hopping in Teheran mit der Künstlerin Homa Arkani

Es sind sieben Stationen mit der Metro von Karaj nach Teheran Ekbatan, und freitags sind hauptsächlich Menschen unterwegs, die einen Ausflug machen. Was bei uns der Sonntag ist, ist im Iran der Freitag. Trockene Hitze drückt sich von außen an die Scheibe des Zuges, während Peter und ich im wohl klimatisierten, gemischten Abteil (meist steigen Frauen und Männer in getrennte Abteile ein) sitzen und beobachten, wie wir beobachtet werden.

Karaj_Metro

Wir sind auf dem Weg zu einem Treffen mit Homa Arkani. Eine grandiose Künstlerin, wie ich finde, die es schafft mit ihrer fotorealistischen Malerei, die tragische Komödie ihrer Generation einzufangen. Es sind meist Frauen, die wiehybride Gestalten die westliche Kultur mit ihrer lokalen Tradition vermischen.
Aufmerksam geworden bin ich über das Netz. Irgendwo hab ich ihre Bilder gesehen und war direkt gefangen und überwältigt. Ich musste sie sehen, sie sprechen.

Die siebte Station. Ekbatan. Draußen auf der Straße stehen erwartungsvoll Taxis in einer Reihe und rufen uns ihre Fahrtrichtungen entgegen. Ich versuche Homa zu entdecken. Etwas weiter die Straße hinauf steht eine kleine, zarte Person in einem Rock und Ballerinas, neben einem weißen Auto (irgendwie gibt es in Teheran auffällig viele weiße Autos). Wir begrüßen uns, wie es in Iran üblich ist; drei Küsse auf die Wangen und mein Lächeln im Gesicht wird breiter.
Gespannt, welchen Plan sie sich für unseren gemeinsamen Nachmittag ausgedacht hat, stiegen wir in ihr Auto und fuhren los in Richtung City.

Der Freitag in Teheran ist das Ereignis für die Kunstszene. Zahlreiche Galerien öffnen ihre Türen und Homa hatte drei Galerien für uns raus gesucht.
Es dauerte nicht lange und wir verwickelten uns in ein tiefes Gespräch über uns unser Leben – sie in Teheran, ich in Berlin. „Schau mal,“ sie deutete auf der Autobahn auf einen Wagen, der an uns vorbei fuhr. „So was gibt es viel hier. Der Fahrer tätowiert von oben bis unten und auf der Rückscheibe klebt ein Koranvers.“  Sie lächelte. Da war sie wieder; die Tragik in der Komödie.

 

blumen

Ich hielt mit Fragen Wie ist es als Malerin in Iran zu arbeiten? oder Hattest du schon mal Schwierigkeiten mit dem Staat zunächst inne. Ich kenne die Antwort. Wer hier lebt, findet sich damit ab, dass es ein Doppelleben gibt. Dinge, die gesagt werden dürfen und Dinge, die dich in Schwierigkeiten bringen. Selbstzensur fängt beim Rausgehen aus der Haustür an. Dann gibt es Grauzonen, in denen es möglich ist sich so zu bewegen, dass niemand offensichtlich was dagegen sagen kann.

Norden_Teheran

Wir fuhren die erste Galerie im Norden Teherans, der hauptsächlich mit luxuriösen Hochhäusern bestückt ist, an.
Entlang einer hohen Mauer liefen wir zum Haupteingang der Ariana Art Gallery.„Diese Galerie gibt es erst seit einigen Monaten und sie ist sehr besonders, da wir solch eine freie und große Fläche noch nie hatten.“ Bereitete mich Homa bereits vor der Tür vor.

Arian_Galerie

Und tatsächlich, wir betraten einen Garten, indem ich eine Leichtigkeit spürte. So fühlt es sich an, wenn man eine Grauzone betritt.  Der Wind wehte direkt unsere Kopftücher vom Kopf. Am liebsten hätte ich es abgenommen. Aber ich denke, damit wäre niemanden etwas Gutes getan. Diese Grauzonen stehen unter Beobachtung, sie werden zugelassen, aber wenn sich daraus ein Aufstand gegenüber vorherrschender Moral bilden sollte, werden sie gleich wieder geschlossen.

Der große Garten und die Menschen darin versprühten eine Energie, die mich nach zwei Wochen Aufenthalt, wieder tief durchatmen ließ. Vieles war so, wie ich es aus Deutschland kenne; Menschen, in gelassener Stimmung, die sich unterhalten. Keine Hektik, kein Lärm, kein Stress und saubere Luft.

Nilo_Homa

Homa: “Es ist ein Ventil für die Menschen hier. Es hilft davor, dass die Stimmung nicht überkocht.”
Ich:”Aber wenn sie wollten, könnten sie, das hier schließen?”
Homa: “Ja natürlich.”

Ehebett

Die Ausstellung behandelte auf sehr unterhaltsame und anspruchsvolle weise, gesellschaftliche Themen, die nicht offen angesprochen werden können: Zensur, Frau sein in einem von Männern dominierten Gesellschaft, Ehe, die Vermischung der traditionellen Kultur mit modernen Einflüssen. Inszeniert wurden die Themen nach den Vorgaben der islamischen Richtlinien.

weiblichkeit

Draußen auf dem Hof nahmen wir uns etwas Zeit, bevor es weiter ging. Ein Erfrischungsgetränk und der Blick auf die weiteren Besucher, die uns kurz nach Berlin versetzen. Lange, zottelige Haare bei den Männern, blaugefärbte Haare einer Frau, die Kontrast zu ihrem zitronengelben leichten Tuch auf dem Kopf bieten und T-Shirts mit Message:

needwifi

Peter und ich verließen die Galerie mit einem sehr guten Gefühl und tiefer Dankbarkeit, dass Homa uns diesen Ort gezeigt hat. Gespannt auf die nächsten Stationen, machten wir uns wieder auf dem Weg in den älteren Teil des nördlichen Teherans, wo wir die  Aaran Art Gallery und die Homa Art Gallery besuchten.

Galerie_Eingang

Wohnhäuser, deren Keller zu einer Ausstellungsfläche umgebaut wurde, die aber nicht weniger imponierend war. Abgesehen von den großartigen Malereien, die wir zu Gesicht bekamen, waren wir hier von dem stylischen Ambiente angetan.

pool

 

Die vorletzte Station: Khaneh Honarmandan

Zum Anbruch der Dunkelheit, kam auch die Schließzeit der Galerien. Wir waren aber noch nicht müde und Homa beschloss uns mit ins Khaneh Honarmandan – zu Deutsch Das Haus der Künstler – zu nehmen. Zum ersten Mal sahen wir ein vegetarisches Restaurant auf unserer Reise und nach langer Zeit wieder Menschen, die Deutsch sprachen.

khaneh_honarmandan

Für Peter war das großartig, war er doch sehr gefangen, weil viele sehr wenig bis gar kein Englisch sprachen. Leider kam es nicht, dazu, dass wir mit ihnen ein Gespräch führen konnten. Unser Tisch war weiter weg und es gab noch vieles, was wir Homa noch fragen wollten:

Peter: “Ist es schwer für dich deine Kunst hier auszustellen?
Homa: “Es gibt viele Vorgaben, an die man sich halten muss. Eine offizielle Stelle, die für kulturelle Belange zuständig ist, prüft Ausstellungen vor der offiziellen Eröffnung und urteilt, ob was gezeigt werden kann oder nicht. Bei meinen letzten Ausstellungen wurden einige meiner Bilder zensiert, weil einmal das Bein von einer Frau, die sich sonnt, nicht bedeckt war, dann ein anderes, weil eine Szene mit drei Frauen im Auto gezeigt wurde (siehe Bild unten), deren dargestelltes Verhalten einer schlechten kulturellen Erziehung entsprach.”

adad-bede1

Ich:”Was macht das mit dir und welche Auswirkungen hat das auf deine Arbeit?”
Homa:”Die Zensur und die Einschränkungen sind der Motor für meine Kreativität. Ich weiß nicht, wie ich mit uneingeschränkter Freiheit arbeiten würde. Aber deshalb möchte ich gerne ins Ausland, um das auszuprobieren. Der Blick von außen, wie du es hast. Das würde mich sehr interessieren.”
Ich, mit einem grinsen: “So viel anders sind wir nicht.”

Gespraech_homa_niloufar

 

Letzte Station: Ekbatan

Auf dem Weg nach Ekbatan fuhren wir an dem Tor der Freiheit vorbei. Ein unbeschreibliches Gefühl, nach solch einem Tag, der mir gezeigt hat, dass diese Kultur weder mir noch meinem deutschen Mann fremd ist. Veränderung ist ein Prozess, der nicht über das Knie gebrochen werden kann, selbst, wenn dies mit der Würde der Menschen passiert, sobald sie an der Oberfläche, oberhalb der unterirdischen Räume nach Luft schnappen wollen.

azadi

 

Quelle:

@nielow „Nix zu sehen – Kultur-Curry aus dem Feld“ Erzählt Geschichten, die ihr begegnen. Aus dem Netz, der Nachbarschaft, aus Berlin, Deutschland oder aus ihrer alten Heimat Iran.

Es sind sieben Stationen mit der Metro von Karaj nach Teheran Ekbatan, und freitags sind hauptsächlich Menschen unterwegs, die einen Ausflug machen. Was bei uns der Sonntag ist, ist im Iran der Freitag. Trockene Hitze drückt sich von außen an die Scheibe des Zuges, während Peter und ich im wohl klimatisierten, gemischten Abteil (meist steigen Frauen und Männer in getrennte Abteile ein) sitzen und beobachten, wie wir beobachtet werden.

Karaj_Metro

Wir sind auf dem Weg zu einem Treffen mit Homa Arkani. Eine grandiose Künstlerin, wie ich finde, die es schafft mit ihrer fotorealistischen Malerei, die tragische Komödie ihrer Generation einzufangen. Es sind meist Frauen, die wiehybride Gestalten die westliche Kultur mit ihrer lokalen Tradition vermischen.
Aufmerksam geworden bin ich über das Netz. Irgendwo hab ich ihre Bilder gesehen und war direkt gefangen und überwältigt. Ich musste sie sehen, sie sprechen.

Die siebte Station. Ekbatan. Draußen auf der Straße stehen erwartungsvoll Taxis in einer Reihe und rufen uns ihre Fahrtrichtungen entgegen. Ich versuche Homa zu entdecken. Etwas weiter die Straße hinauf steht eine kleine, zarte Person in einem Rock und Ballerinas, neben einem weißen Auto (irgendwie gibt es in Teheran auffällig viele weiße Autos). Wir begrüßen uns, wie es in Iran üblich ist; drei Küsse auf die Wangen und mein Lächeln im Gesicht wird breiter.
Gespannt, welchen Plan sie sich für unseren gemeinsamen Nachmittag ausgedacht hat, stiegen wir in ihr Auto und fuhren los in Richtung City.

Der Freitag in Teheran ist das Ereignis für die Kunstszene. Zahlreiche Galerien öffnen ihre Türen und Homa hatte drei Galerien für uns raus gesucht.
Es dauerte nicht lange und wir verwickelten uns in ein tiefes Gespräch über uns unser Leben – sie in Teheran, ich in Berlin. „Schau mal,“ sie deutete auf der Autobahn auf einen Wagen, der an uns vorbei fuhr. „So was gibt es viel hier. Der Fahrer tätowiert von oben bis unten und auf der Rückscheibe klebt ein Koranvers.“  Sie lächelte. Da war sie wieder; die Tragik in der Komödie.

 

blumen

Ich hielt mit Fragen Wie ist es als Malerin in Iran zu arbeiten? oder Hattest du schon mal Schwierigkeiten mit dem Staat zunächst inne. Ich kenne die Antwort. Wer hier lebt, findet sich damit ab, dass es ein Doppelleben gibt. Dinge, die gesagt werden dürfen und Dinge, die dich in Schwierigkeiten bringen. Selbstzensur fängt beim Rausgehen aus der Haustür an. Dann gibt es Grauzonen, in denen es möglich ist sich so zu bewegen, dass niemand offensichtlich was dagegen sagen kann.

Norden_Teheran

Wir fuhren die erste Galerie im Norden Teherans, der hauptsächlich mit luxuriösen Hochhäusern bestückt ist, an.
Entlang einer hohen Mauer liefen wir zum Haupteingang der Ariana Art Gallery.„Diese Galerie gibt es erst seit einigen Monaten und sie ist sehr besonders, da wir solch eine freie und große Fläche noch nie hatten.“ Bereitete mich Homa bereits vor der Tür vor.

Arian_Galerie

Und tatsächlich, wir betraten einen Garten, indem ich eine Leichtigkeit spürte. So fühlt es sich an, wenn man eine Grauzone betritt.  Der Wind wehte direkt unsere Kopftücher vom Kopf. Am liebsten hätte ich es abgenommen. Aber ich denke, damit wäre niemanden etwas Gutes getan. Diese Grauzonen stehen unter Beobachtung, sie werden zugelassen, aber wenn sich daraus ein Aufstand gegenüber vorherrschender Moral bilden sollte, werden sie gleich wieder geschlossen.

Der große Garten und die Menschen darin versprühten eine Energie, die mich nach zwei Wochen Aufenthalt, wieder tief durchatmen ließ. Vieles war so, wie ich es aus Deutschland kenne; Menschen, in gelassener Stimmung, die sich unterhalten. Keine Hektik, kein Lärm, kein Stress und saubere Luft.

Nilo_Homa

Homa: “Es ist ein Ventil für die Menschen hier. Es hilft davor, dass die Stimmung nicht überkocht.”
Ich:”Aber wenn sie wollten, könnten sie, das hier schließen?”
Homa: “Ja natürlich.”

Ehebett

Die Ausstellung behandelte auf sehr unterhaltsame und anspruchsvolle weise, gesellschaftliche Themen, die nicht offen angesprochen werden können: Zensur, Frau sein in einem von Männern dominierten Gesellschaft, Ehe, die Vermischung der traditionellen Kultur mit modernen Einflüssen. Inszeniert wurden die Themen nach den Vorgaben der islamischen Richtlinien.

weiblichkeit

Draußen auf dem Hof nahmen wir uns etwas Zeit, bevor es weiter ging. Ein Erfrischungsgetränk und der Blick auf die weiteren Besucher, die uns kurz nach Berlin versetzen. Lange, zottelige Haare bei den Männern, blaugefärbte Haare einer Frau, die Kontrast zu ihrem zitronengelben leichten Tuch auf dem Kopf bieten und T-Shirts mit Message:

needwifi

Peter und ich verließen die Galerie mit einem sehr guten Gefühl und tiefer Dankbarkeit, dass Homa uns diesen Ort gezeigt hat. Gespannt auf die nächsten Stationen, machten wir uns wieder auf dem Weg in den älteren Teil des nördlichen Teherans, wo wir die  Aaran Art Gallery und die Homa Art Gallery besuchten.

Galerie_Eingang

Wohnhäuser, deren Keller zu einer Ausstellungsfläche umgebaut wurde, die aber nicht weniger imponierend war. Abgesehen von den großartigen Malereien, die wir zu Gesicht bekamen, waren wir hier von dem stylischen Ambiente angetan.

pool

 

Die vorletzte Station: Khaneh Honarmandan

Zum Anbruch der Dunkelheit, kam auch die Schließzeit der Galerien. Wir waren aber noch nicht müde und Homa beschloss uns mit ins Khaneh Honarmandan – zu Deutsch Das Haus der Künstler – zu nehmen. Zum ersten Mal sahen wir ein vegetarisches Restaurant auf unserer Reise und nach langer Zeit wieder Menschen, die Deutsch sprachen.

khaneh_honarmandan

Für Peter war das großartig, war er doch sehr gefangen, weil viele sehr wenig bis gar kein Englisch sprachen. Leider kam es nicht, dazu, dass wir mit ihnen ein Gespräch führen konnten. Unser Tisch war weiter weg und es gab noch vieles, was wir Homa noch fragen wollten:

Peter: “Ist es schwer für dich deine Kunst hier auszustellen?
Homa: “Es gibt viele Vorgaben, an die man sich halten muss. Eine offizielle Stelle, die für kulturelle Belange zuständig ist, prüft Ausstellungen vor der offiziellen Eröffnung und urteilt, ob was gezeigt werden kann oder nicht. Bei meinen letzten Ausstellungen wurden einige meiner Bilder zensiert, weil einmal das Bein von einer Frau, die sich sonnt, nicht bedeckt war, dann ein anderes, weil eine Szene mit drei Frauen im Auto gezeigt wurde (siehe Bild unten), deren dargestelltes Verhalten einer schlechten kulturellen Erziehung entsprach.”

adad-bede1

Ich:”Was macht das mit dir und welche Auswirkungen hat das auf deine Arbeit?”
Homa:”Die Zensur und die Einschränkungen sind der Motor für meine Kreativität. Ich weiß nicht, wie ich mit uneingeschränkter Freiheit arbeiten würde. Aber deshalb möchte ich gerne ins Ausland, um das auszuprobieren. Der Blick von außen, wie du es hast. Das würde mich sehr interessieren.”
Ich, mit einem grinsen: “So viel anders sind wir nicht.”

Gespraech_homa_niloufar

 

Letzte Station: Ekbatan

Auf dem Weg nach Ekbatan fuhren wir an dem Tor der Freiheit vorbei. Ein unbeschreibliches Gefühl, nach solch einem Tag, der mir gezeigt hat, dass diese Kultur weder mir noch meinem deutschen Mann fremd ist. Veränderung ist ein Prozess, der nicht über das Knie gebrochen werden kann, selbst, wenn dies mit der Würde der Menschen passiert, sobald sie an der Oberfläche, oberhalb der unterirdischen Räume nach Luft schnappen wollen.

azadi

 

 

 Quelle: NILOFAR

 

Graffiti Künstler in Iran – Propaganda der westlichen Kultur und Verbreitung von Satanisten Logos

Das Urteil für Graffiti Künstler in Iran fällt meist sehr hart aus, denn sie werde bezichtigt, westliche Propaganda und Satanisten Logos zu verbreiten. Dabei sind die Themen der meisten jungen Künstler friedvoll. 
Diese kleine Doku zeigt einen historischen Rückblick auf das verbreiten von politischen Slogans. Angefangen von der Revolution 1978/79 bis hin zu den Unruhen 2009.

schrei_streetart_iran


Es ist kein Wunder, dass die Regierung das Anbringen von Bildern an öffentlichen Wänden nicht als eine eigene Kunstform anerkennt, denn diese Form des Ausdrucks ist politischer und ideologischer Propaganda vorbehalten. Dass es hier eine Entwicklung in der Subkultur gegeben hat, bekommen die wenigsten mit. Zu stark ist noch die Konnotation mit einer politisch, ideologischen Absicht, hier außerhalb eines politischen Kontexts zu agieren ist fast unmöglich.

wall_iran

Die Generation im Krieg geborener Kinder bringt sich immer mehr im öffentlichen Raum mit ihrer friedvollen Message ein. Ein weiterer Prozess der zum Neudenken einer liberaleren Gesellschaft anregen soll. Angefangen auf der Straße.

ARTE|FREISPIELEN IM IRAN – Ein Wandertheater

Die Schauspielertruppe um Regisseur Hamed hat sich mittlerweile von Teheran auf den Weg gemacht Richtung Westiran. Unter freiem Himmel strömen die Kinder zusammen, um das Märchen vom bösen König Ejdehak zu erleben. Der Sage nach unterdrückte er im alten Persien grausam sein Volk, bis die tapfere Faranak die Menschen befreite.

Die Schauspielertruppe um Regisseur Hamed hat sich mittlerweile von Teheran auf den Weg Richtung Westiran gemacht. In den abgelegenen Ortschaften werden sie mit ihrem bunt bemalten Lastwagen von den Schulklassen begeistert empfangen. Unter freiem Himmel strömen die Kinder zusammen, um das Märchen vom bösen König Ejdehak zu erleben. Der Sage nach unterdrückte er im alten Persien grausam sein Volk, bis die tapfere Faranak und ihr Sohn Fereydoun die Menschen vom Despoten befreiten.

Mit ihren bunten Masken, der Musik und den Kostümen sind die fremden Besucher auf jedem Dorfplatz eine Attraktion. Mitra, Hamed, Sina und Shirin wissen aber auch, dass sie während der gesamten Reise unter staatlicher Beobachtung stehen. Denn für Theateraufführungen im Iran gelten strenge Regeln. Und die Schauspieler können nur vermuten, wer der Spitzel ist. Doch das ist nicht die einzige Schwierigkeit, der sie sich stellen müssen.

Diese Folgen der Freispielen im Iran sind derzeit verfügbar, sie können sie auch direkt im Webbrowser öffnen:

Culture| An Iranian dissident returns home

Popular filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof has returned to Tehran from exile. In an exclusive interview, he explains why.

by 

Iranian director Mohammad Rasoulof
Iranian director Mohammad Rasoulof shows his green scarf — a sign of support for the country’s opposition movement — in 2009.
Rafa Rivas / AFP / Getty Images

TEHRAN — Friends and family warned Mohammad Rasoulof not to return to Tehran. The award-winning director still had a prison sentence looming over his head after being arrested during a shoot in 2010, charged with threatening national security and making propaganda against Iran’s Islamic state.

Rasoulof’s friend and collaborator, the renowned director of “White Balloon,” Jafar Panahi, who was arrested at the same time, is still under house arrest. Further, Rasoulof had just released his most uncompromising film to date. “Manuscripts Don’t Burn” — which won the International Federation of Film Critics Award at Cannes and is currentlyscreening at New York’s Museum of Modern Art — is an undisguised criticism of Iran’s feared security services, and Rasoulof’s most overtly political work yet. Still, he ignored the advice and came home.

He arrived in Tehran in September 2013, a month after the inauguration of President Hassan Rouhani. The police confiscated his passport, but have otherwise left him alone so far. Rouhani has promised to bring change to Iran, and although that change is moving slowly, things are certainly different from when Rasoulof lived here four years ago.

“When I was arrested, I was saying the exact same things as Mr. Rouhani is saying now. I wonder why nobody arrests him,” Rasoulof says with a laugh.

The 42-year-old filmmaker shuffles around his backyard in a washed-out black sweatshirt, dragging his plastic slippers along the ground with every step. When he sits back in his chair at his small working table, shaded by a tree, he can enjoy something close to silence. This is the only interview he has agreed to since his return, but he does not seem nervous. Here, sheltered from the frantic noise of Iran’s capital, Rasoulof has room to breathe. And that is exactly what many Iranian artists hope to get under Rouhani’s government.

“Of course, one has to be very stupid to think that after Rouhani’s election, the entire Islamic Republic will change,” Rasoulof says. “The important thing is that we can help move things slowly in the right direction.”

In 2010, Mohammad Rasoulof was arrested on the set of the movie he was working on about the Green Movement protests the year before. Along with his collaborator, Jafar Panahi, he was sentenced to six years in prison (later reduced to one) and a 20-year ban on filmmaking.

The two are among Iran’s most prominent directors, having won prizes at festivals in Cannes and Berlin. But whereas Panahi’s arrest was met with international outrage in the form of protest speeches and empty jury chairs at film festivals, Rasoulof did not receive the same collegial support. He is, in a sense, the forgotten martyr of the same struggle.

But he wanted it that way. Whereas Panahi smuggled movies out of the country while under house arrest, Rasoulof kept a low profile. In Iran, sentences for political prisoners are often not carried out immediately, but continue to hover menacingly over their heads indefinitely. So while waiting to serve his sentence, Rasoulof decided to go with his wife and daughter to Germany.

Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Spiegel| Als Frau allein unterwegs: „Iran ist das gastfreundlichste Land, das ich kenne“

Von 

Zwei Monate lang reiste Helena Henneken allein durch Iran. 80 Einladungen, 390 Gläser Tee und 28 Gastgeschenke später ist sie fasziniert von dem Land. Im Interview erzählt sie von strikten Regeln und Nächten im Frauenmatratzenlager.

Zur Autorin
  • Benjamin Nadjib

    Helena Henneken, 1977 in Paderborn geboren, ist weit und viel gereist: von Kolumbien bis Feuerland, durch Usbekistan, Kirgisien, Indien, Bhutan und Indonesien. Wenn sie zu Hause in Hamburg ist, arbeitet sie als Coach und Kommunikationsberaterin. Das Buch „They would rock“ über ihre 59-tägige Iran-Reise hat sie gemeinsam mit der Designerin und Filmemacherin Frizzi Kurkhaus gestaltet.

  • Homepage von Helena Henneken

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Wie haben Ihre Freunde reagiert, als Sie von Ihren Reiseplänen nach Iran erzählten?

Henneken: Einige sagten: „Iran? Wie spannend!“ Aber diese Stimmen waren eindeutig in der Unterzahl. Viele Freunde oder Bekannte fragten verständnislos: „Ausgerechnet Iran?“ Die meisten verbinden mit dem Land eher Düsteres, die politischen Schlagzeilen. So ging es mir auch. Ich wollte aber gerne mehr über die Menschen dort erfahren.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Sie sind allein gereist. Wussten Sie, worauf Sie sich einlassen?

Henneken: Das Allein-Unterwegssein hatte ich auf einer Weltreise vor ein paar Jahren schon geprobt und wusste: Das kann ich gut. Und in den meisten Ländern gibt es ja eine ausgezeichnete Backpacker-Infrastruktur. In Iran nicht, daher waren meine Reisevorbereitungen gründlich. Ich habe Sachbücher und Reiseführer gelesen, sechs Wochen lang Farsi-Sprachunterricht genommen, iranische Filme geguckt. Und ich habe mit mir selbst eine Abmachung getroffen: Sollte ich merken, dass die Reise blauäugiger Quatsch ist, kehre ich um und fahre in die Türkei.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Frühzeitig abgereist sind Sie nicht. Im Gegenteil, Sie haben Ihr Touristenvisum sogar verlängert und waren zwei Monate allein auf Achse. Immer mit einem guten Gefühl?

Henneken: Immer. Klar, man sollte seinen gesunden Menschenverstand nicht ausschalten und ein Gespür dafür haben, wann Grenzen überschritten sind. Aber ich habe mich nie unwohl gefühlt. Der große Vorteil am Alleinreisen ist: Man ist viel offener, wird öfter angesprochen und eingeladen. Und genau das liebe ich am Reisen: die unerwarteten Begegnungen und Gespräche mit Fremden.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Sie erzählen in Ihrem Buch von Begegnungen mit Hauptstädtern in Teheran, kurdischen Dorfbewohner, Mullahs, anarchistischen Studenten, Künstlern oder Hausfrauen. Während 59 Reisetagen kamen Sie auf über 80 Einladungen – war so viel Gastfreundschaft und Interesse nicht auch anstrengend?

Henneken: Einsam habe ich mich jedenfalls fast nie gefühlt. Iran ist das gastfreundlichste Land, das ich je kennengelernt habe. Ständig haben mich Wildfremde auf der Straße, im Supermarkt oder im Park angesprochen. Mindestens mit einem überschwänglichen „Welcome to Iran“. Oft folgte eine Einladung. In einem Dorf wurde ich fünf Tage lang herumgereicht. Nie durfte ich mithelfen, und Gastgeschenke funktionieren in Iran umgekehrt: Der Gastgeber nimmt nichts an, dafür wird der Gast beschenkt. Ich habe Armbänder, CDs, Bildbände, ein pinkfarbenes T-Shirt mit Glitzersteinen und Handyanhänger bekommen, die mich immer noch oft an die Menschen und eine fantastische Reise zurückdenken lassen.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Als westlicher Besucher fällt man in Iran auf – nicht nur freundlichen Gastgebern. Das Land ist ein Überwachungsstaat. Hatten Sie je das Gefühl, beobachtet zu werden?

Henneken: Nein. Natürlich habe ich viele Geschichten gehört und mich immer wieder gefragt, ob ich einfach zu naiv bin und bloß nicht merke, dass ich beobachtet werde. Auch war ich sehr erstaunt, wie offen die Iraner nicht nur in den eigenen vier Wänden, sondern auch in aller Öffentlichkeit, zum Beispiel im Sammeltaxi, über Politik sprechen. Das hatte ich nicht erwartet. Mein Eindruck ist: Trotz strikter Regeln nehmen sich viele ihre Freiheiten, und einiges wird toleriert.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Zum Beispiel?

Vollständiger Artikel

DW| Misshandlungen im Evin-Gefängnis

Eigentlich hatte Irans Präsident Hassan Rohani mehr Freiheit und Rechtsstaatlichkeit versprochen. Doch jetzt setzt ein Fall von schwerer Misshandlung an politischen Gefangenen im Evin-Gefängnis Rohani unter Druck.

Evin Gefängnis in Teheran im Iran

Hassan Rohani hatte vor seiner Wahl zum iranischen Präsidenten im Juni 2013 versprochen, sich für die Freilassung zahlreicher politischer Gefangener einzusetzen. „Ich bin ein Jurist, kein General“. Mit diesem Slogan war Rohani in den Wahlkampf gezogen. Es war eines seiner zentralen Versprechen. Doch jetzt wirft ein Skandal im berüchtigten Teheraner Evin-Gefängnis erneut ein Schlaglicht darauf, dass dieses Versprechen noch längst nicht eingelöst ist.

Dort, in Evin, sitzen mehrere politische Gefangene seit Wochen in Einzelhaft. Sie sollen am 17.April 2014 während eines Kontrollgangs von Spezialkräften gefesselt worden sein. Man habe ihnen die Augen verbunden und sie stundenlang verprügelt und misshandelt. Menschenrechtaktivisten und internationale Organisationen wie Amnesty International, die International Federation for Human Rights oder Reporter Ohne Grenzen forderten den iranischen Präsident in mehreren Petitionen auf, den Vorfall aufzuklären.

Schläge und Demütigungen im Evin-Gefängnis

Abdolfathah Soltani im Gefängnis (Foto:Maede Soltani)

Dieses Foto ihres Vaters postete Maede Soltani auf Facebook

„Es waren ursprünglich 30 Gefangene“, berichtet Maede Soltani. „Auch mein Vater war dabei. Er kam nach zwei Nächten aus der Einzelhaft heraus“, so die Tochter des Rechtsanwalts Abdolfattah Soltani gegenüber der DW. Soltani ist auch Träger des Internationalen Nürnberger Menschenrechtspreises 2009 und hat im Iran zahlreiche bekannte Dissidenten verteidigt. Wegen seines Einsatzes für die Menschenrechte wurde der heute 60-Jährige nach der umstrittenen Wiederwahl Mahmud Ahmadinedschads zum iranischen Präsidenten im Juni 2009 festgenommen und drei Jahre später zu 18 Jahren Haft verurteilt. Die Strafe wurde zwar im Nachhinein auf 13 Jahre verkürzt. Doch sitzt Soltani seitdem in Trakt 350 des Evin-Gefängnisses, dort, wo zahlreiche politische Gefangene inhaftiert sind.

„Meinen Vater haben sie nicht so übel verprügelt wie die anderen. Vielleicht, weil er im Iran eine bekannte Figur ist“, vermutet die junge Industrie-Designerin Maede Soltani, die seit fünf Jahren in Deutschland lebt. Soltanis Kopfhaar und Bart wurden aber wie bei den anderen Gefangenen abgeschnitten – für die Betroffenen ein besonderer Akt der Demütigung.

Seine Tochter hat ein Foto ihres Vaters auf Facebook gepostet. Sie und Familienangehörige anderer politischer Gefangener veröffentlichen häufig Informationen aus dem Gefängnis in sozialen Netzwerken. Immer wieder protestieren sie vor Regierungsgebäuden. In einem offenen Brief an den iranischen Präsidenten fordern sie die Aufklärung der jüngsten Vorkommnisse.

Druck der Öffentlichkeit und Drohungen des Regimes

Irans Justizminister Sadegh Amoli Laridjani

Sadegh Laridschani warnte vor der Verbreitung „falscher Informationen über Menschenrechtsverletzungen im Iran“

Unter dem Druck der Öffentlichkeit richtete Hassan Rohani eine entsprechende Untersuchungskommission ein. Tatsächlich verlor am 23.April Gholam Hosein Esmaili seinen Posten als Chef der iranischen Gefängnisverwaltung. Er hatte den Vorfall geleugnet. Doch nur einen Tag später wurde er von Irans Justizminister Sadegh Laridschani zum neuen Justizchef der Provinz Teheran ernannt. Der jüngere Bruder des ehemaligen Atomunterhändlers Ali Laridschani warnte zugleich alle Oppositionellen davor, Interviews mit ausländischen Medien zu führen und „Lügen über Menschenrechtsverletzungen im Iran zu verbreiten“. Den Gefangenen im Evin-Gefängnis warf er vor, sich ordnungswidrig verhalten und sich gegen die regulären Kontrollgänge aufgelehnt zu haben.

Die iranische Menschenrechtaktivistin Narges Mohammadi lässt sich trotz aller Drohungen nicht einschüchtern und will die Hoffnung nicht verlieren: „Die Lage der Gefangenen hat sich zwar bislang nicht geändert. Aber Ruhani hatte versprochen, den Vorfall aufzuklären“, teilt die ehemalige Geschäftsführerin des mittlerweile verbotenen iranischen Zentrums für Menschenrechtsverteidiger (CHRD) in Teheran mit. „Wir wissen genau, dass konservative Kräfte in den Regierungskreisen versuchen, diese Aufklärung zu verhindern“, so Narges Mohammadi. Doch noch warte man auf das Ergebnis der Untersuchungskommission.

Bekanntes Muster

Taghi Rahmani (Foto:DW)

Der Journalist Taghi Rahmani glaubt, ein „bekanntes Muster“ zu erkennen

Der Einsatz der Spezialkräfte im Gefängnis und die brutale Misshandlung der wehrlosen politischen Gefangene sei eine geplante Aktion gewesen, meint Taghi Rahmani. Der Journalist und Menschenrechtsaktivist hat selbst mehr als 14 Jahre im Gefängnis verbracht und lebt heute im Pariser Exil. Rahmani, 2005 von Human Rights Watch mit einem Preis für politisch verfolgte Journalisten ausgezeichnet, meint: „Ultrakonservative Kräfte wollen mit solchen Angriffen die gemäßigten Kräfte um Rohani in die Knie zwingen. Und sie wollen die Angst in der Gesellschaft schüren, um die Lage weiter zu beherrschen. Damit folgen sie demselben Muster wie in der Khatami-Zeit.“ Der reformorientierte Kleriker Mohammad Khatami war von 1997 bis 2005 Irans Präsident, konnte dabei aber nicht verhindern, dass während seiner Amtszeit Studentenproteste brutal niedergeschlagen und viele Oppositionelle und Intellektuelle systematisch verschleppt und ermordet wurden.

Die Ultrakonservativen, die nun die Mehrheit im Parlament besitzen und viel stärker in der Machtstruktur verwurzeln seien als damals, wollten auch Rohani die Grenzen seiner Macht aufzeigen, so Rahmani weiter. Hoffnung auf Aufklärung des Vorfalls im Evin-Gefängnis hat er nicht.

Konsequenzen gefordert

Außenmauer des Teheraner Evin-Gefängnisses (Foto:dpa)

Was geschah hinter diesen Gefängnismauern?

Bis jetzt hat Hassan Rohani keine offizielle Erklärung zu diesem Fall abgegeben. Die International Federation for Human Rights hat nun in einem offenen Brief an den UN-Sonderberichterstatter für Menschenrechte Aufklärung über die Vorgänge im Evin-Gefängnis gefordert.

Shirin Ebadi setzt keine Hoffnungen mehr auf eine Verbesserung der Menschenrechtslage im Iran durch Rohani. „Weder wird dieser Vorfall aufgeklärt werden, noch die vielen anderen, die in Irans Gefängnissen geschehen“, so die Friedensnobelpreisträgerin gegenüber der DW. „Die internationale Gemeinschaft muss den Menschen im Iran helfen.“ Ebadi fordert eine Verschärfung der Sanktionen von EU und USA gegen jene, die im Iran Menschenrechte verletzen. Falls sie Vermögen im Ausland besäßen, müsse dieses eingefroren werden, so wie das bei vielen anderen Mitgliedern des iranischen Staatsapparates schon der Fall sei, so Ebadi.

Quelle: Deutsche Welle

New Hope amid Persistent Challenges for Women in Iran: Interview with Parisa Kakaee

An Iranian protester at the End Male Violence Against Women rally in London, March 2010. (Gary Knight/flickr)

“The main problem for all the social and political groups inside [Iran] is the atmosphere of insecurity,” according to Parisa Kakaee, a women and children’s rights activist from Iran. “When these groups don’t have freedom of speech or activity, how can they recognize and address society’s needs?”

Ms. Kakaee is all too familiar with this dilemma. After being arrested for her human rights activities in 2009 and spending a month in prison, she fled her native land. She was then sentenced in absentia to six years in prison and has been living in exile in Germany ever since.

In a phone interview, Ms. Kakaee suggested that security, women’s rights, and socioeconomic development are all intertwined in Iran: “When women’s employment is subject to the permission of her husband … when parliament encourages society to have more children and limits women’s access to contraception, when domestic violence is considered as a private family matter, how do we expect to eradicate poverty, to promote gender equality, and to empower women to reduce high mortality rates or to combat HIV/AIDS?,” she asked.

“We can’t talk about gender equality and empowering women while there is a law that supports child marriage. How is it possible to improve maternal health when a child becomes a mother?”

After eight years under the conservative government of President Ahmadinejad, last year’s election of President Rouhani breathed new hope into the women’s movement in Iran, according to Ms. Kakaee. The appointment of legal scholar Mrs. Shahindokht Molaverdi in the cabinet, for example, shows that there have been some positive steps in terms of women’s participation in policymaking.

Nonetheless, significant challenges remain. Iran continues to have “a male-dominated and conservative parliament” that could still reverse the limited progress that has been made, Ms. Kakaee said, and “systematic changes in the regime’s policy on women’s rights and girls’ rights are necessary.”

Inside Iran, “women’s rights activists are fighting for their freedom of speech, fighting against discrimination laws, and try[ing] to support development for women and girls,” she said. But the international community still has a role to play.  If relations between Iran and the rest of the world can be improved, then “civil society can focus on social and economic problems and human rights rather than concerns arising from the risk of war or the impact of sanctions,” she said. “It’s important that the international community prioritizes concerns about the violation of human rights in Iran over other political and economic issues.”

The interview was conducted by Marie O’Reilly, associate editor at the International Peace Institute.

Transcript

When you spoke to the Global Observatory last year, you described how the situation of women in Iran had evolved during the conservative era of the government of President Ahmadinejad. Since the June 2013 election of President Rouhani, how has the situation changed for women in Iran?

Well, talking about the people’s situation in a country is not easy when you don’t live there. However, as an observer and follower of the news and reports, I can say that since the election of President Rouhani, Iranians have developed fresh hope for some changes in the situation of women and human rights. Based on the president’s promises, this hope didn’t seem unrealistic. However, I felt, at the time, that it was too early to judge. It was a hope that could fade or continue to exist.

I would like to categorize the positive changes into two groups. First, within the Iranian women’s movement I think the above-mentioned hope reactivated the women’s movement and made them able to come together, organize some groups, hold some meetings on women’s rights, develop their main demands from the new government, and continue their unprohibited activities.

Second, there have been some changes in policymaking and women’s participation. For example, there is some noticeable improvement in licensing surrounding the establishment of NGOs. That may lead to more activity in various areas related to women, such as violence, impoverishment, sexual health, et cetera.

In addition, some of the women’s rights activists believe that appointing Mrs. Shahindokht Molaverdi as vice-president for women and family affairs is a positive step, which could—could—affect decisions and policy relating to women’s rights. If she has sufficient authority, she may retrieve what we had lost over the past eight years. However, I think, we should not forget that she works in a male-dominated government and society.

And aside from the limited positive progress, Iran has a male-dominated and conservative parliament, which can pass policies against human rights. For example, parliament is initiating a new plan called the Comprehensive Population and Family Excellence Plan that imposes some restrictions on women’s employment and educational, health, and civil rights. Women’s rights activists have issued a statement objecting to the plan, but it’s expected that the new government will use all its power to stop this plan too.

As I mentioned last year, Iranian women are still suffering from domestic violence and a lack of supportive laws. There are still unemployed women, unequal wages, prostitution, discriminatory laws against women, restrictions on personal freedom, and education and economic problems. In addition, some groups in the women’s movement still cannot hold official meetings about, for example, 8th of March [International Women’s Day].

I personally don’t expect the new government to solve all the problems overnight, but I think there should be some sign of momentum in supporting women’s rights—a momentum that I don’t currently see.

Here in New York, we recently concluded the 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women, and its theme this year was the challenges and achievements of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls. What do you see as the challenges and achievements of the MDGs for women and girls in Iran?

I think the main problem for all the social and political groups inside the country is the atmosphere of insecurity. When these groups don’t have freedom of speech or activity, how can they recognize and address society’s needs?

Women’s rights activists are doing their best to take advantage of existing resources and make changes in women’s lives. But when women’s employment is subject to the permission of her husband, they can’t act independently. When parliament encourages society to have more children and limits women’s access to contraception, when domestic violence is considered as a private family matter, how do we expect to eradicate poverty, to promote gender equality, and to empower women to reduce high mortality rates or to combat HIV/AIDS?

In my opinion, to achieve the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls, partnership between government and civil society is important. I’m not saying that government has not done anything about—for instance, in terms of HIV/AIDS or maternal health or primary education, et cetera. Rather, I think it’s not sufficient.

Government and parliament need a more gender-sensitive approach to policymaking and planning for women and girls. We can’t talk about gender equality and empowering women while there is a law that supports child marriage. How is it possible to improve maternal health when a child becomes a mother?

Therefore, I believe systematic changes in the regime’s policy on women’s rights and girls’ rights are necessary. Women’s rights activists are fighting for their freedom of speech, fighting against discrimination laws, and they try to support development for women and girls at the same time. I think this is a tough challenge, and it’s not an easy job.

Late last year the international community and Iran reached an agreement to ease some sanctions in line with the scaling back of Iran’s nuclear activities. Has this easing of sanctions had an impact on the situation of women?

First of all, as far as I know the number of eased sanctions is low. Secondly, the massive damage caused by sanctions is not something that can be fixed in a short time. As I mentioned last year, the Iranian people and civil society are under pressure from international sanctions and structural economic and political mismanagement. People are happy that the risk of entering into war is being eliminated, and they have more hope for the future. However, most of the sanctions remain, and the economic situation has not significantly changed.

Unemployment, unequal access to education, and poverty are part of the problems that affect vulnerable people, such as women, children, and marginalized groups. Therefore, I think Iranian people—and especially women—are still under pressure as a result of the sanctions.

Parisa, what would you suggest the international community could do to support women’s and children’s rights in Iran?

In general, improving relations between Iran and the world should be considered by the both sides—the Iranian regime and the international community—as a first step to reduce the economic pressure on people. In this way, civil society can focus on social and economic problems and human rights rather than concerns arising from the risk of war or the impact of sanctions. Second, it’s important that the international community prioritizes concerns about the violation of human rights in Iran over other political and economic issues. It’s important to support the activists in danger inside the country and question the regime about human rights violations.

Also, I think having more women’s and children’s rights experts in the country would improve work in this area, so providing college education opportunities for Iranian activists to continue their education abroad could also help. We have to gain specialized knowledge and exchange experiences.

Source: IPI Global Observatory

Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

%d Bloggern gefällt das: