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Iran – 20th Session of Universal Periodic Review

https://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1722935254001/?bctid=3868635228001&autoStart=false&secureConnections=true&width=480&height=270

Mr. Mohammad Javad Ardeshir Larijani, Secretary of the High Council for Human Rights of Islamic Republic of Iran (Introduction)

2. South Africa, Ms. Noumisa Pamella Notutela

00:22:17

3. Spain, Mr. Luis Ángel Redondo Gómez

00:23:33

4. Thailand, Mr. Thani Thongphakdi

00:24:50

5. Egypt, Mr. Essameldin Abdelhamid Mowad Ashour

00:26:04

6. Sweden, Mr. Jan Knutsson

00:28:30

7. Switzerland, Mr. Alexandre Fasel

00:29:42

8. Syrian Arab Republic, Mr. Hussam Eddin Aala

00:30:44

9. Sri Lanka, Mr. Ravinatha P. Aryasinha

00:33:19

10. The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Mr. Dusko Uzunovski

00:34:36

11. Tunisia, Mr. Sami Bougacha

00:35:42

12. Turkmenistan, Mr. Hemra Amannazarov

00:37:02

13. United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Mr. Mark Matthews

00:38:18

14. United States of America, Mr. Keith Mr. Harper

00:39:24

15. Uruguay, Mr. Patricio Silva Muñoz

00:40:35

16. Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Ms. Luisa Rebecca Sánchez Bello

00:42:07

17. Viet Nam, Ms. Mai Lien Vu

00:43:09

18. Yemen, Mr. Ali Mohamed Saeed Majawar

00:44:29

19. Zimbabwe, Mr. Charles Chishiri

00:45:46

20. Afghanistan, Mr. Atiqullah Murad

00:47:02

21. Algeria, Ms. Zahira Abed

00:48:20

22. Angola, Mr. Apolinário Jorge Correia

00:49:35

23. Argentina, Ms. Marina Mantecon Fumado

00:50:38

24. Armenia, Ms. Hasmik Tolmajyan

00:51:49

25. Australia, Ms. Tanya Bennett

00:53:03

26. Austria, Mr. Karl Prummer

00:54:09

27. Bahrain, Mr. Yusuf Abdulkarim Bucheeri

00:55:37

28. Bangladesh, Mr. Shameem Ahsan

00:56:57

29. Belarus, Ms. Inna Vasilevskaya

00:58:12

30. Belgium, Mr. Pierre Gillon

00:59:25

31. Benin, Ms. Maurille Biaou

01:00:47

32. Bhutan, Ms. Tashi Peldon

01:01:54

33. Bolivia, Ms. María Natalia Pacheco Rodriguez

01:03:05

34. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ms. Snežana Višnjić

01:04:25

35. Brazil, Ms. Regina Maria Cordeiro Dunlop

01:05:37

36. Brunei Darussalam, Ms. Nurussa’adah Muharram

01:06:55

37. Burkina Faso, Ms. Myriam Claudine Yabiyuré Poussi

01:08:08

38.

01:09:22

39. Canada, Ms. Elissa Golberg

01:10:41

40. Chad, Mr. Malloum Bamanga Abbas

01:56:14

41. Chile, Ms. Marta Maurás

01:57:33

42. China, Ms. Danhui Song

01:59:06

43. Costa Rica, Ms. Elayne Whyte Gómez

02:00:20

44. Cuba, Ms. Anayansi Rodríguez Camejo

02:01:38

45. Cyprus, Mr. Andreas Ignatiou

02:02:48

46. Czech Republic, Mr. Victor Velek

02:03:59

47. Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Mr. Se Pyong So

02:05:02

48. Denmark, Ms. Sisse Norman Canguilhem

02:06:18

49. Djibouti, Mr. Ahmed Mohamed Abro

02:07:30

50. State of Palestine, Ms. Nada Tarbush

02:08:41

51. Eritrea, Mr. Bereket Woldeyohannes

02:09:51

52. Estonia, Mr. Jüri Seilenthal

02:11:21

53. Ethiopia, Mr. Ephrem Bouzayhue Hidug

02:12:35

54. Finland, Mr. Stefan Lee

02:13:39

55. France, Mr. Nicolas Niemtchinow

02:14:43

56. Germany, Mr. Joachim Rücker

02:16:07

57. Ghana, Ms. Laila Heward-Mills

02:17:19

58. Greece, Mr. Alexandros Alexandris

02:18:25

59. Guatemala, Mr. Juan Antonio Benard Estrada

02:19:48

60. Hungary, Ms. Zsuzsanna Horváth

02:21:01

61. Iceland, Mr. Thórdur Sigtryggsson

02:22:12

62. India, Ms. Gloria Gangte

02:23:23

63. Indonesia, Mr. Triyono Wibowo

02:24:45

64. Iraq, Mr. Abdel Kareem Al-Janabi

02:25:45

65. Ireland, Ms. Breda Lee

02:27:05

66. Israel, Mr. Eviatar Manor

02:28:09

67. Italy, Ms. Simona Battiloro

02:29:40

68. Japan, Mr. Kotaro Suzuki

02:30:57

69. Kazakhstan, Mr. Bakbergen Koishibayev

02:32:13

70. Kuwait, Mr. Jamal M.I. Alghunaim

02:33:35

71. Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mr. Xayfhong Sengdara

02:34:50

72. Latvia, Mr. Rolands Ezergailis

02:36:13

73. Lebanon, Ms. Najla Riachi Assaker

02:37:16

74. Lithuania, Mr. Rytis Paulauskas

02:38:34

75. Luxembourg, Mr. Jean-Marc Hoscheit

02:39:45

76. Malaysia, Ms. Raja Intan Nor Zareen

02:41:22

77. Mali, Mr. Amadou Opa Thiam

02:42:36

78. Mauritania, Ms. Fatma Isselmou

02:43:48

79. Montenegro, Mme Zorica Marić-Djordjević

02:45:13

80. Myanmar, Mr. Maung Wai

02:46:31

81. Netherlands, Mr. Roderick Van Schreven

02:47:24

82. New Zealand, Mr. Carl Allan Reaich

02:48:36

83. Nicaragua, Mr. Néstor Cruz Toruño

02:49:29

84. Niger, Mr. Issoufou Garba

02:50:48

85. Nigeria, Mr. Patrick C.Y. Gbemudu

02:51:59

86. Norway, Ms. Harriet E. Berg

02:53:21

87. Oman, Mr. Abdulla Nasser Al Rahbi

02:54:41

88. Pakistan, Mr. Aamar Aftab Qureshi

02:56:13

89. Paraguay, Ms. Raquel Cristina Pereira Farina

02:57:35

90. Peru, Ms. Claudia Portillo Gonzáles

02:58:56

91. Poland, Mr. Jerzy Baurski

03:00:20

92. Portugal, Ms. Ana Helena Pinheiro Marques

03:01:34

93. Qatar, Mr. Almuhannad A. Al-Hammadi

03:03:09

94. Republic of Korea, Mr. Ye Se-Min

03:04:22

95. Romania, Ms. Maria Ciobanu

03:05:31

96. Russian Federation, Ms. Anastasia Bogdatieva

03:06:36

97. Senegal, Mr. Serigne Dieye

03:07:45

98. Sierra Leone, Ms. Yvette Stevens

03:09:08

99. Singapore, Mr. Steven Pang

03:10:27

100. Slovakia, Mr. Martin Kmošena

03:11:38

101. Slovenia, Mr. Vojislav Šuc

03:12:48

102. Uzbekistan, Mr. Javohir Nurmetov

03:14:05

103. Mexico, Mr. Jorge Lomónaco

03:15:21

104. Mr. Mohammad Javad Ardeshir Larijani, Secretary of the High Council for Human Rights of Islamic Republic of Iran (Final Remarks)

03:16:48

Source: UN TV

NZZ| Iran verteidigt seine Menschenrechtspolitik

Iran hat vor dem Uno-Menschenrechtsrat in Genf seine Menschenrechtspolitik verteidigt. Delegationschef Mohammed Dschawad Laridschani verwies stattdessen auf Fortschritte im Bereich Frauen- und Kinderrechte und im Kampf gegen Terrorismus und Drogen.

Es ist bereits das zweite Mal, dass sich Iran vor dem Uno-Menschenrechtsrat einem Prüfverfahren unterziehen muss. Diverse Organisation der Zivilgesellschaft hatten fehlende Fortschritte in der Menschenrechtspolitik der Islamischen Republik seit dem ersten Bericht vor vier Jahren bemängelt.

Im Verlauf der Debatte zeigte sich der Schweizer Vertreter, Botschafter Alexandre Fasel, besorgt über die zunehmende Zahl der Todesstrafen. Er bemängelte das Fehlen von gerechten Verfahren, vor allem im Fall der am vergangenen Sonntag gehängten Reyhaneh Dschabbari.

Quelle: NZZ Ticker

No Expected Changes in Upcoming UPR on Iran

dead end

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a mechanism by the UN Human Rights Council(HRC) to review the state of human rights in 42 states once every 4.5 years. Its recommendations are handed over to the reviewed country which can either accept them or not. The working group in charge of the UPR is composed of UN members, including the State under Review (SuR), but is open also to relevant NGO’s.

The next UPR on Iran is scheduled for the 31st of October.

Iran implements 2.3% of all recommendation from last UPR

In the last UPR on Iran from 2010, a total of 212 recommendations were placed by 51 countries – Iran accepted 126 recommendations.

To date, it has implemented 5 and partially implemented another 30. The unimplemented recommendations represent the suffering of Iranians under a regime which does not tolerate human rights. You can find an interactive map of all recommendations here.

GRAPH

The lack of implementation doesn’t come as a big surprise for people interested in human rights in Iran but it should shake up a bit the supporters of the regime in Iran. More importantly, it should serve as a clear mirror to shatter the hypocrisy of Iranian leaders who keep on denying that the regime in Tehran is a serial offender of human rights.

Two people who should answer to the UPR but won’t

Two people in particular should have to answer openly to the UPR on Iran.

The first is Javad Larijani, Iran’s human rights chief.

Unfortunately, he systematically denies any problem of human rights in Iran, believes that being gay is a sickness and condones the use of torture, stoning and hanging because they are an integral part of Sha’ariah law. He also denies the existence of political prisoners, religious persecution, and basically any reports of human rights violations in Iran. Based on his modem operandi, he will probably evade and/or deny all accusations and follow up with accusations of his own that the UPR is political and does not accept the cultural and religious laws on which the Islamic Republic of Iran was born.

Chances are, he will evade, deny, accuse and rant profusely and won’t come even close to accept, answer or change anything that turns up in the review.

The second person who should answer to the UPR is President Rouhani.

Rouhani, pegged early on as a moderate, won his presidency on a ticket of change inforeign policy and human rights.

He did live up partially to half of his promises: His open foreign policy led to the nuclear negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 and to an unceasing list of foreign delegations of diplomats and businessmen to Tehran who are eager for sanctions to be lifted in order to make money…lots of money. The result of his efforts is evident in a big boost in the economy as well as numerous political and economic deals within and outside of the framework of the sanctions.

Unfortunately, Rouhani’s interior policy doesn’t live up to his promises and can be summed up in one word: silence. Rouhani has, for over a year, managed to dodge any questions regarding human rights violations in Iran even when faced with mounting evidence of abuses including state-promoted gender segregation, the highest rate of hangings to date, brutal cases of torture, amputations and floggings, imprisonment of political opponents and journalists, persecution of religious women, gays and religious minorities, clamping down on the freedom of speech and use of the internet and on and on and on.

Here’s a video which outlines the gap between his rhetoric and the reality in Iran.

He has remained silent to date and will probably remain silent.

On human rights and WMD’s

The violations of human rights in Iran and the repeated denials of the regime in Tehran symbolize not only the suffering of the Iranian people but also testify to the regime’s insistence to live according to its own perceptions with total disregard to international norms. The regime in Tehran is not open to criticism from within or from without and prefers to work only through the principles of the Islamic Revolution and the word of their Supreme Leader Khamenei.

It is this mindset that has led to the impasse on Tehran’s nuclear program as a result of multiple accounts of breaches of IAIA requirements and a low level of transparency. The growing suspicions on a military aspect to the nuclear program led to the crippling sanctions which, in a way, brought on the presidency of Rouhani and the need to negotiate. Some commentators believe that Rouhani is focusing first on his foreign policy and that once he inks a nuclear deal he will try to make right on his promises for better human rights. Maybe…or maybe the regime will continue to thumb its nose at its people and the world.

Source: Iran 24/07

Confront Iran’s Human Rights Violations through Personal Stories of Persecution


Impact Iran Coalition and International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran draw attention to Iran’s upcoming human rights review
October 14, 2014— Impact Iran, a coalition of human rights organizations, in partnership with the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran, today launched a new video, “Promises Made, Promises Broken.” The video is part of a series aimed at drawing attention to Iran’s second Universal Periodic Review (UPR) at the UN Human Rights Council on October 31, 2014. A new video will be released each week leading up to the review.

Their first video features nine persecuted Iranians who powerfully tell their stories of repression, harassment, detainment and torture in their own words. While these activists, bloggers, lawyers and students put a face to Iran’s human rights abuses, their stories are shared by many Iranians whose rights are violated every day.

“’Promises Made, Promises Broken‘ tells the story of Iran’s human rights abuses through the compelling personal accounts of those who have experienced firsthand what it is like to live with this level of repression,” said Hadi Ghaemi, executive director of the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran. “These individuals were targeted because of their religious beliefs, their peaceful rights advocacy, their sexual orientation, and their ethnicity, which goes against all of Iran’s human rights commitments.”

Despite the fact that Iran accepted 126 recommendations from UN Human Rights Council member countries at its last UPR in 2010, it has not honored the majority of these commitments, and violations continue to occur. For example, Iran agreed to improve protections against torture and ill treatment of detainees. However, several of the Iranians featured in “Promises Made, Promises Broken” report being victims of physical and psychological torture during their unjust detainments. The video calls on viewers throughout the international community to raise their voices and hold Iran accountable for its track record on human rights.

An analysis of Iran’s UPR commitments is available at www.ImpactIran.org and www.UPRIran.org.

“As Iran’s second UPR approaches, it has never been more important that we take measures to ensure the Iranian government keeps its human rights promises,” said Mani Mostofi, Director of Impact Iran. “This video series puts human faces to each of Iran’s repressive practices and urges viewers to raise their voices in solidarity with these persecuted Iranians to hold Iran accountable.”

#UPRIRAN #UPR20

Source: International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran

U.S. Official Details Human Rights Abuses in Iran

May 11, 2011

Testimony

Michael H. Posner
Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor

Philo L. Dibble
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs

Statement before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs

Washington, DC

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