Blog-Archive

Would You Marry Me? Child Marriage in Iran

This week our design intern Patryk has been working with Maral to produce an image that uses data gathered from Ebtekar News  and the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child. At first glance the bold numbers jump off the page, leading us to delve deeper into the narratives behind the numbers.

The 13 hidden in the background?

Sharia law recognises girls as adults when they turn nine, and while the minimum age for marriage in Iran is 13 for girls and 15 for boys, younger children can be married off with the approval of their guardians and the court.

85% of the nearly 2 million Iranians under the age of 19 to marry over the past 6 years were girls.

More than 200,000 Iranians under the age of 15 were married; 97% of them were girls.

In 2010, 716 Iranian girls younger than 10 were married.

Who is asking, „Would you marry me?“

The Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Dr Ahmad Shaheed, wrote in his latest UN report that he is ‚deeply concerned about reports that the Legal Affairs Committee of the Iranian Parliament has announced that the law that prohibits the marriage of girls below the age of 13 is considered to be “un-Islamic and illegal”‘.

 

JFI at the UN session examining Islamic Republic policies on sex change, women, Afghans and Ahwazi Arabs

After a twenty-year delay on the part of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the 50th session of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in Geneva was able to examine reports on serious human rights violations by the Islamic Republic, including those concerning enforced sex change operations and the creation of Afghan-free zone.

To contribute to this significant event, Justice for Iran (JFI) representatives submitted numerous briefingsand attended the session to present details pertaining to systemic human rights violations against women, Afghan immigrants and the Ahwazi Arab community and members of the lesbian,gay and transgender communities in conjunction with Iranian Lesbian and Transgender Network (6Rang). Furthermore, through repeated efforts JFI drew attention to discriminatory measures imposed by the State through unequal inheritance and work rights based on gender, quota system against women in higher education, forced marriage and sexual abuse of the girl children, marital rape, among others. The Islamic Republic delegation composed of experts in health and hygiene, employment, social services, and the environment, lead by Khosrow Hakimi, Advisor to the Head of the Judiciary and Deputy Secretary of the High Council for Human Rights, were presented with questions and concerns raised by JFI among other NGOs.

All of the 17-member delegation failed to provide satisfactory responses to the dedicated Committee session held on Wednesday 1 May 2013. JFI was one of two NGOs present at the session. “This is the first of many efforts by JFI to not just work with the office of the UN Special Raporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran, but through a wide range of channels and bodies of the United Nations to shift the dialogue on Iran to one that is human rights-centric rather than one that is focused on the nuclear issue”, said Shadi Sadr, the Executive Director of JFI “it is our hope that the results of this session will influence Islamic Republic state policies involving women, LGBT community, Afghan immigrants and the Ahwazi Arabs in accordance with international laws and standards.”

As part of this process the Committee will record all concerns raised in its concluding remarks, all of which the Islamic Republic is responsible to implement and report on in its next review.

Justice For Iran’ was established in July 2010 with the aim of addressing the crime and impunity prevalent among Iranian state officials and their use of systematic sexual abuse of women as a method of torture in order to extract confession. It uses methods such as documentation of human rights violations, and research about authority figures who play a role in serious and widespread violation of human rights in Iran; as well as use of judicial, political and international mechanisms in place, to execute justice, remove impunity and bring about accountability to the actors and agents of human rights violations in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Source: JFI

 

Iran ./. UNHCR – Documents

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iran (Islamic Republic of) The boundaries and names shown on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations

Iran (Islamic Republic of) and UN Charter-based Bodies

Iran (Islamic Republic of) and UN Treaty Bodies

 

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