Blog-Archive

Witness Testimony of Habib Farahzadi: a student activist and law graduate

In this witness statement, Habib Farahzadi–a student activist and law graduate now living in exile–discusses his membership in the leading student activist group, the Islamic Society of Democracy-Seeking Students, his involvement in the post June 2009 presidential election protests, and his eventual imprisonment and trial as a result of these activities. Farahzadi also discusses the increasing academic restrictions on students and professors at universities in Tehran during the Ahmadinejad presidency.

Name: Habib Farahzadi

Place of Birth:  Tehran, Iran 

Date of Birth:  30 December 1987

Occupation:  Law Graduate and Translator

Interviewing Organization: Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (IHRDC)

Date of Interview:  20 October 2012

Interviewer: IHRDC Staff Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Witness Statement of Farshid

Witness Statement of Farshid

 

In this witness statement, Farshid—a gay Iranian man—discusses his arrest and subsequent rape by the Iranian authorities, and his expulsion from university on account of his homosexual orientation.

 

 

Name: Farshid (pseudonym)

Place of Birth:  Tehran, Iran 

Date of Birth:  1986

Interviewing Organization: Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (IHRDC)

Date of Interview:  15 September 2012

Interviewer: IHRDC Staff


This statement was prepared pursuant to an interview with Farshid [note: a pseudonym has been given to the witness to protect his identity]. It was approved by Farshid on May 3, 2013. There are 43 paragraphs in the statement.

The views and opinions of the witness expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center.

Introduction

1.   My name is Farshid. I was born in Tehran in 1986. I lived in Iran until 2010. I am a homosexual man.

2.   I left Iran at the age of 24 and sought asylum in Turkey. I have been living in Canada for about seven months. I studied electronic engineering at Islamshahr Islamic Azad University before I was expelled. I worked as a hairdresser while I was in school, and also for a short while after I was expelled.

Rape

3.   I was raped once. I was with a number of my gay friends in Vali-e Asr Avenue. It was around 12:00 or 12:30 am. I think it was in fall 2007. It was cool [outside] and I was wearing a sweater and a scarf. We parked the car and took a walk to get ice cream. Two plainclothes basijis approached us. They were bearded. They showed us their identification cards. I think one of them was named Mohammadi or Mohammadian. I grew up in a family that taught me that I should not accept anything without reason. In our family we were taught to be strong, to ask questions, and to be brave. I was always like that. They approached us and asked us what we were doing at that late hour. First, I asked them why we had to answer their questions. They responded that they were officers. I said that I wanted to see their identification cards. They showed us their cards. One of them looked 34 or 35, and the other one looked 27 or 28. The man whose name was Mohammadi or Mohammadian looked older. I did not see the younger officer’s identification card. The older officer showed his card and asked questions, and I had to answer him. He showed me two cards: one identified him as member of the basij and the other card identified him as an employee of the Ministry of Intelligence and National Security. At the top of the card it said “Ministry of Intelligence and National Security.”

4.   He asked: Why are you here at this late hour? I said that we had parked our car up the street. He asked who owned the car. I said that it was mine. He asked for my documents, and I showed them. He started searching my car, and he found a pack of condoms in the dashboard. He asked: What is this?  “Condoms,” I said. He asked: What is this doing in your car? I said that I bought it from a pharmacy, and if it was a bad thing they would not be selling it at the pharmacy. He said: The pharmacy is for someone who has a wife. Do you have a wife? He took the condoms, and I could not say anything because someone who is unmarried cannot be involved with another person in Iran. He did not know that I was gay. Of course, at that late hour, and while I was in the middle of the street, I could not tell him that if I wanted to, I could enter into a temporary marriage[1] with anyone. It would be funny if a 22-year old man says this. He told us to get lost. He harassed us a little and then he was gone. They had motorbikes. But they were back after a minute or two. Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Witness Statement of Rebin Rahmani: A Kurdish Activist

In this witness statement, Rebin Rahmani—a Kurdish rights activist—discusses his activism at university in Iran, including his research on the problems of drug addiction, AIDS and prostitution in Kermanshah.

Rahmani also details his arrest in 2006 and the terrible conditions he endured in detention in the years following until his release from prison in 2008. Now living abroad, Rahmani continues to work to defend the rights of prisoners in Iran.

 

 

Name: Rebin (Karim) Rahmani

Place of Birth:  Kamyaran, Iran 

Date of Birth:  23 September 1983 

Occupation:  Kurdish Human Rights Activist  


Interviewing Organization: Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (IHRDC)

Date of Interview:  16 January 2012

Interviewer: IHRDC Staff


This statement was prepared pursuant to an interview with Rebin (Karim) Rahmani. It was approved by Rebin (Karim) Rahmani on 29 April 2012. There are 52 paragraphs in the statement.

Background

1.   My name is Karim Rahmani, and I am known by my Kurdish name “Rebin” among activists and friends. I was born on March 27, 1983 in the city of Kamyaran. In Iran, I was a senior year computer science major at the University of Science and Industry in Arak.

2.   I was arrested in November 2006 on the road between Karmanshah and Sarpol-e Zahab. I was sentenced to acting against national security and given a five year prison sentence in the lower court proceeding. At the appeal level, my sentence was reduced to two years. After my two year imprisonment, in October 2008, I was released from Dizel-Abad prison of Kermanshah. I left Iran in March 2011. Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Witness Statement of Jalel Sherhani

In this witness statement, Jalel Sherhani—a 44 year old Ahwazi Arab now residing outside of Iran—describes the plight of the Ahwazi Arabs, an ethnic minority in Iran, and the persecution and discrimination he and several of his family members faced. In particular, Sherhani recounts the arrest, imprisonment and execution of his family members at the beginning of the Iran-Iraq War and the subsequent confiscations of land owned by the Sherhani family during the war.

Name: Jalel Sherhani

Place of Birth:  Ahvaz/Ahwaz, Iran 

Date of Birth:  January 21, 1969 

Occupation:  Self-employed         


Interviewing Organization: Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (IHRDC)

Date of Interview:  September 25, 2012

Interviewer: IHRDC Staff


This statement was prepared pursuant to an interview with Jalel Sherhani. It was approved by Jalel Sherhani on April 17, 2013. There are 63 paragraphs in the statement.

The views and opinions of the witness expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center.


Background

1.   My name is Jalel Sherhani. I was born in Ahwaz[1] on January 21, 1969. Before leaving Iran, I was self-employed in the informal sector—I will explain later why that was the case. I believe that I faced discrimination from the state not only during my childhood and when I entered school, but even since my birth. Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Islamic Penal Code of the Islamic Republic of Iran – Book One & Book Two

Iran Human Rights Documentation Center

The Iran Human Rights Documentation Center (IHRDC) is pleased to release a comprehensive English translation of Book One and Book Two of the Islamic Penal Code of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

The translation incorporates all amendments to the Code up to January 2012 and covers matters such as, inter alia, the trial and punishment for sex crimes such as adultery and sodomy; the trial and punishment for consumption of alcohol and other intoxicating substances; the trial and punishment for moharebeh (warring against God) and efsad-e-fel-arz (corruption on Earth) and the trial and punishment for theft.

Book One -Preliminary

Chapter 1 – General Provisions

Chapter 2 -The Punishments and Security and Correction Measures

Section 1 -The Punishments and Security and Correction Measures

Section 2 -Mitigation of Punishment

Section 3 -Suspension of execution of punishment

Section 4 -Conditional release of prisoners

Chapter 3 -Offences

Section 1 -Attempting an offence

Section 2 -Associates and accomplices of an offence

Section 3 -Multiplicity of offences

Section 4 -Recurrence of crime

Chapter 4 -Scope of criminal liability

Book Two –Hudud  

Chapter 1 –Hadd punishment for Zina 

Section 1 -Definition and grounds of hadd punishment for zina

Section 2 -Procedure of proving adultery in the court

Section 3 -Different types of hadd punishment for zina

Section 4 -The procedure of execution of the hadd punishment

Chapter 2 –Hadd punishment for sodomy (livat)

Section 1 -Definition and reasons of hadd punishment for sodomy

Section 2 -Procedure of proving sodomy in the court

Chapter 3 –Musaheqeh [sex between women]

Chapter 4 –Procuring/Pandering

Chapter 5 –Qazf [false accusation of sexual offences]

Chapter 6 –Hadd punishment for [consumption of] intoxicants

Section 1 -Reasons of the hadd punishment for [consumption of] intoxicants

Section 2 -Conditions of the hadd punishment for [consumption of] intoxicants

Section 3-The procedure of execution of the hadd punishment

Section 4 -Conditions of nullification or pardon of the hadd punishment for [consumption of] intoxicants

Chapter 7 -Moharebeh and corruption on earth [efsad-e-fel-arz]

Section 1 -Definitions

Section 2 -Procedure of proving moharebeh and corruption on earth

Section 3 –Hadd punishment for moharebeh and corruption on earth

Chapter 8 –Hadd Punishment for theft

Section 1 -Definition and conditions

Section 2 -Procedure of proving theft

Section 3 -Conditions of execution of the hadd punishment

Section 4 -The hadd punishment for theft Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Witness Statement of Hamed, an Iranian homosexual


(March 12, 2013) — In this witness statement, Hamed–a homosexual Iranian man–discusses his activities with the LGBT community inside Iran, the government’s treatment of members of the LGBT minority and society’s views towards LGBTs.

He also reveals how he helped establish and celebrate the first National Day of Sexual Minorities in Iran in Tehran in 2010.


Name: Hamed (Pseudonym)

Place of Birth:  Tehran, Iran 

Date of Birth:  1982 

Occupation:  Computer Programmer       Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Witness Statement of Saeed Pourheydar: A Journalist Under Pressure


In this witness statement and short video testimony, Saeed Pourheydar—an Iranian journalist now living in exile—discusses his arrest following the disputed June 2009 presidential elections in Iran and his subsequent detention at Evin prison.

In his statement, Pourheydar notes the pressures on himself and other Iranian journalists to not send news to the outside world and describes how his cell phone communications were monitored and under surveillance by Iranian authorities. Pourheydar also describes his trial before Judge Pirabbasi of Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran and how he received news of the death sentences of Gholamreza Khosravi and Saeed Malekpour.


Name: Saeed Pourheydar

Place of Birth:  Orumiyeh, Iran  

Date of Birth:  1981 

Occupation:  Journalist      

  Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

Iranian Lawyers Call on Iranian Authorities to Cease Infringements on Independence of Legal Profession in Iran

On the occasion of Defense Lawyers’ Day (February 25th) in Iran, a group of 35 Iranian defense and human rights lawyers has published an open letter calling on the authorities in the Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) to cease infringements on the independence of Iran’s legal profession. In particular, the letter calls for the cancellation of a bill that, in essence, transfers total supervisory control over lawyers to a quasi-judicial body and whose passage is described as “a coup de grace to legal practice in Iran”.

Signatories to the letter include Mohammad Olyaeifard—an Iranian lawyer who served one year in prison in 2010 for reportedly speaking out against the execution of one of his juvenile clients.  Other signatories include prominent Iranian criminal defense lawyers like Mehrangiz Kar, Mahnaz Parakand, Shadi Sadr, Mohammad Mostafaei and others who have been forced to flee Iran on account of their representation of clients in matters that the Iranian government finds politically sensitive.

In recent years, the Iranian parliament, judiciary and executive have imposed increasingly restrictive measures on the Iranian Bar Association and its members through formal measures and in practice that result in infringements on the independence of the profession. The open letter calls attention to one particularly concerning development—the proposal and passage of the “Bill for Formal Attorneyship” which, among other measures, seeks to appoint a supervisory body that will grant control over the issue, suspension and revocation of attorney licenses to the judiciary; grant the judiciary ownership over the Iranian Bar Association’s property and assets; and change the name of the “Bar Association” to the “Organization of Attorneys” so as to imply its subordination to the judiciary.

In light of these concerns, the letter calls on the Iranian judiciary to withdraw the Bill as soon as possible, the Iranian government to refuse the confirmation and submission of the Bill to Parliament and on the members of Parliament, in the event they should receive the Bill, to reject its provisions. Lies den Rest dieses Beitrags

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